GCAP Blog

Bringing innovation to practice in adapting to climate change.
Feb
22

The UK Climate Change Risk Assessment 2017

UK CRA

You might have missed it under the deluge of Trump and Brexit news, but the UK Climate Risk Assessment 2017 was published last month. A five-yearly requirement under the 2008 Climate Change Act, the results will be used to inform the development of the next instalment of the UK National Adaptation Programme, due in 2018.

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Feb
18

The impact of failing to understand information flow within climate adaptation and resilience responses

by Wilson Hui https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Each year, at the Oxford Adaptation Academy, participants develop 'stakeholder maps' to establish the impact of their work and to highlight areas that...
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Feb
16

3 key challenges for Green Investment Banks

A recent OECD/New Climate Economy report on Green Investment Banks (GIBs) has found that 12 ‘GIB or GIB-like’ institutions now exist across the world, almost all of which have been created in the past 5 years. While the progress highlighted in the report is promising, my impression is that 3 key challenges remain for these institutions in promoting large-scale, low-carbon resilient development:

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Feb
09

Is Global Climate Change Good for Business?

Is Global Climate Change Good for Business?By Steve Wilson

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Feb
02

Growth in the wrong place: water and jobs in the U.S

US Population Growth
US Precipitation

The U.S has a problem. No, not that one, but a very particular problem related to the geography of growth and water availability. Put simply, both population growth and job growth in the U.S appears to increasingly concentrated in a handful of states, while a significant number, in particular in the Midwest, are experiencing decreases in population, with internal migration playing an big role. Adam Carstens has a neat summary at Medium highlighting these trends, and Forbes notes that 7 of the 10 of their ‘best for jobs’ cities in 2017 are concentrated in water-stressed western states (Utah, Arizona, Texas and California). Importantly, these are not just short-term blips, but reflect longer-term changes as well – 7 of the 10 fastest growing states from 1990-2000 were also western states.

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